Campaigns

Making Bristol better for cycling

Space for Cycling

Lots of people cycle in Bristol, bringing great benefits to themselves, and to the city. But two thirds of people consider cycling too risky for them. They want protection from intimidating motor traffic. They know that sharing with pedestrians can be uncomfortable for both. The only proven way to open cycling for all is to provide a continuous and dedicated cycling network, to ‘Triple A’ standards – for All Ages and Abilities.

This is the work of our Space for Cycling action group. It means setting out a positive vision, proposing radical ideas, and speaking up for cycling. The S4C group meets every month, uses a forum, and an issues map. Introduce yourself to get involved. Remember that most campaigning is done not through the formal group but by individuals getting stuck in to an issue that concerns them, using this useful information.

Space for Cycling means:

  • REDUCED THROUGH-TRAFFIC  on residential streets making streets more pleasant and liveable for residents
  • PROTECTED SPACE – Lots of high quality, protected, continuous, cycleways.
  • SAFE ROUTES TO SCHOOL so that children can to cycle to school safely helping them be more active and independent
  • PEOPLE-FRIENDLY CENTRES – Prioritising walking, cycling and public transport makes public spaces more pleasant places to work, shop and relax.
  • TRAFFIC-FREE ROUTES – Open new routes for cycling, giving safer options for recreation and commuting.
  • LOWER TRAFFIC SPEEDS – Design streets to naturally encourage lower speeds

Recent posts about making Space for Cycling (click for full list)

  • Local Cycling & Walking Infrastructure Plan Consultation

    Local Cycling & Walking Infrastructure Plan Consultation

    The West of England Combined Authority (WECA) - remember them, Metro Mayor, Tim Bowles? - have shown scant interest in active travel. But they have now put out a Local Cycling and Walking Infrastructure Plan (LCWIP) for a consultation which closed on 15 March 2020. This is important as the LCWIP is the only game in town for cycling improvements in Bristol and the surrounding area. It’s a mixed bag - quite a few protected cycleways proposed, but

    Read More
  • Public Transport (and cycling!) Not Road Building in the West of England - please sign this petition

    Public Transport (and cycling!) Not Road Building in the West of England - please sign this petition

    The Joint Local Transport Plan for the West of England contains plans for 10 new roads and 5 big road-widening schemes. These plans will damage the countryside, increase traffic, pollution and carbon emissions, when WECA and all four authorities have declared climate emergencies. There is some provision for public transport, and a token nod to cycling and walking, but the vast bulk of the plan and the budget is on more roads and traffic. Please

    Read More
  • Bristol Cycling Campaign response to the Bristol & Bath Railway Path concept designs

    Bristol Cycling Campaign response to the Bristol & Bath Railway Path concept designs

    Update: 23 January 2019 Sustrans is holding a drop-in session 'to explore the latest designs and to help us balance the different ideas as we develop the details together' for the railway path. Details for the session are: Monday 24 February 5:00pm-8:00pm Easton Community Centre, Kilburn Street, Easton, Bristol BS5 6AW (next to the BBRP) Bristol Cycling Campaign response The Bristol & Bath Railway Path is an important asset for local cycling. Increasing use of

    Read More
  • Space for Cycling autumn update

    Space for Cycling autumn update

    Local Cycling and Walking Infrastructure Plan (LCWIP) Over the last 18 months officers at WECA, Bristol City Council, BANES, South Gloucestershire and North Somerset have been developing the new Local Cycling and Walking Infrastructure plan for the West of England sub-region. Bristol Cycling Campaign has been involved throughout the process and has had regular updates on the progress of the plan. It is expected to go out to public consultation in the coming months. We

    Read More
  • A Modest Proposal #8: Jamaica St cycleway

    A Modest Proposal #8: Jamaica St cycleway

    Every cyclist in Bristol will have their own strategy for coping with the James Barton roundabout, one of the worst in Bristol and the subject of our Modest Proposal #5: The Bear Pit / St James Barton Roundabout. Particularly as the Gloucester Road is one of the busiest cycling routes in the city, with its own Modest Proposal #6; Eight to Eighty cycling on Gloucester Road. Most of us make use of Jamaica Street, but it

    Read More
  • Workshops on changes to the Railway Path - have your say!

    Workshops on changes to the Railway Path - have your say!

    Sustrans have funding to improve the Bristol end of the Railway Path between Trinity Road and Clay Bottom. The £1.2m project is being called the One Path: BS5 project and "aims to encourage positive behaviour and tackle issues such as conflict between path users". It is funded by the Department for Transport and will be delivered by Sustrans in partnership with Bristol City Council. Hooray! But hold on there. There's a line of thought that

    Read More
  • What relevance does this weekend's Marathon World Record attempt have for UK cycle infrastructure?

    What relevance does this weekend's Marathon World Record attempt have for UK cycle infrastructure?

    Tomorrow morning (12th October 2019) between 5am and 9am Eliud Kipchoge will attempt to break his marathon world record on a circuit in the famous Prater Park in Vienna. The course he will run is widely used in Vienna for recreation, particularly running races, but also as a main cycling throughfare. Its main attraction, is the tree lined straight "road" that cuts through the park, called the "Hauptalle" (shown from the air with Google Earth

    Read More
  • Space for Cycling Update: April 2019

    Space for Cycling Update: April 2019

    Silverthorne Lane and St Philips Marsh We have recently met developers and consultants about the Silverthorne Lane site and St Philip’s Marsh respectively, part of Temple Quarter. These are likely to be some of the largest re-development sites in Bristol in the coming years and are in close proximity to Temple Island and the University of Bristol Temple Meads site. There is an opportunity to build cycling in at the outset and we will be

    Read More
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3