Lots of people cycle in Bristol, bringing great benefits to themselves, and to the city. But two thirds of people consider cycling too risky for them. They want protection from intimidating motor traffic. They know that sharing with pedestrians can be uncomfortable for both. The only proven way to open cycling for all is to provide a continuous and dedicated cycling network, to ‘Triple A’ standards – for All Ages and Abilities.

This is the work of our Space for Cycling action group. It means setting out a positive vision, proposing radical ideas, and speaking up for cycling. The S4C group meets every month, uses a forum, and an issues map. Introduce yourself to get involved. Remember that most campaigning is done not through the formal group but by individuals getting stuck in to an issue that concerns them, using this useful information.

Space for Cycling means:

  • REDUCED THROUGH-TRAFFIC  on residential streets making streets more pleasant and liveable for residents
  • PROTECTED SPACE – Lots of high quality, protected, continuous, cycleways.
  • SAFE ROUTES TO SCHOOL so that children can to cycle to school safely helping them be more active and independent
  • PEOPLE-FRIENDLY CENTRES – Prioritising walking, cycling and public transport makes public spaces more pleasant places to work, shop and relax.
  • TRAFFIC-FREE ROUTES – Open new routes for cycling, giving safer options for recreation and commuting.
  • LOWER TRAFFIC SPEEDS – Design streets to naturally encourage lower speeds
Recent posts about making Space for Cycling (click for full list)
  • Space for Cycling Update: April 2019

    Space for Cycling Update: April 2019

    Silverthorne Lane and St Philips Marsh We have recently met developers and consultants about the Silverthorne Lane site and St Philip’s Marsh respectively, part of Temple Quarter. These are likely to be some of the largest re-development sites in Bristol in the coming years and are in close proximity to Temple Island and the University of Bristol Temple Meads site. There is an opportunity to build cycling in at the outset and we will be

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  • WECA Joint Local Transport Plan Consultation

    WECA Joint Local Transport Plan Consultation

    So we know our new West of England Combined Authority (WECA), and our new metro Mayor, Conservative Tim Bowles, will soon be celebrating being two years old. What are they for? Well they currently have a Consultation on a plan for transport (called the JLTP) throughout the region up to 2036. Wow an opportunity to make our streets safe and healthy for people and kids. Reduce motor dependency, clean up air quality and create green

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  • Safe Cycling in NW Bristol ? Yes please

    Safe Cycling in NW Bristol ? Yes please

    Want to cycle from Clifton to Henbury along a safe segregated cycle route? No we're not joking; we don't mean messy, sub standard national cycle route 4 but a new route along Westbury Rd, Falcondale Rd and Passage Rd, protected from motors. There is currently a consultation on new bus lanes on the A4018, which don't seem popular locally. It's not ambitious on cycling either; a new route on the Downs and, perhaps, traffic reduction

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  • The results are in - Build it and they will come

    The results are in - Build it and they will come

    Bristol Cycling Campaign has received data from Bristol City Council’s traffic counts on city centre roads where new segregated infrastructure has been built. We advocate protected, segregated cycle tracks as the best way to enable people of all ages and abilities to travel by bike and the results of the counts show it has been enormously successful so far. The segregated cycle track on Baldwin Street in the Old City area of the city centre

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  • Update: City Centre Cycle Network

    Update: City Centre Cycle Network

    Bristol Cycling (BCyc) have recently been engaging with Bristol City Council (BCC) officers about the city centre cycle network. A lot has happened in the last few years so now is a good time for an update on some recent and upcoming schemes: The Prince Street cycle track has been fully open for a few months, is very well used and is functioning pretty well. BCyc raised a few queries about some elements of the

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  • Bristol Transport Strategy Consultation - Our Response

    Bristol Transport Strategy Consultation - Our Response

    Sharp eyed cycle campaign members will have noticed the new Bristol Transport Strategy (BTS), published at the end of September and out for consultation until 2 November 2018. The BTS is Bristol Council's blueprint for defeating congestion, air pollution etc for the next 18 years; until 2036. If you were hoping for better cycling conditions than these people near the BRI, you may be waiting a while longer. The BTS is a curious mixture. In

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  • The Downs. No Cycling? Or a car-free leisure route?

    The Downs. No Cycling? Or a car-free leisure route?

    Why we need space for cycling on the Downs. The annual Cycle Sunday event is a brilliant way to demonstrate the huge demand for car-free cycling around the Downs to the Downs Committee, who manage this beautiful area. (To those unfamiliar with Bristol, the Clifton and Durdham Downs lie to the north of the city centre and overlook the ecologically significant Avon Gorge). We can expect between one and three thousand people to attend these

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  • Why it matters that Bristol is preparing a 'Local Cycling and Walking Infrastructure Plan'

    Why it matters that Bristol is preparing a 'Local Cycling and Walking Infrastructure Plan'

    After intensive lobbying by cycling and walking groups the Government set up a legally binding Cycling and Walking Investment Strategy (CWIS) in 2017. The aim is "to deliver better safety, better mobility, and better streets". All local authorities are supposed to produce a Local Cycling and Walking Infrastructure Plan (LCWIP), setting out their long-term approach to developing local cycling and walking networks, ideally over a 10 year period. In particular this means: a network plan

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