News

Cycling news from Bristol and beyond

Bristol Cycling Campaign Dutch Study Tour 2014

Chrissie Decker writes about her thoughts after going on the BCyC Dutch study tour in Sept 2014. See also this posting. Having experienced the joy of dedicated cycling space in other countries, I have been waiting for us to catch up in the UK. The progress so far is patchy at best and wholly inadequate at worst. Tired of waiting, I decided I had to take action. When Bristol Cycling Campaign organised a study tour to the Netherlands, I grabbed the opportunity to go and see for myself and learn from the masters. The first and greatest thing that struck me was the huge range of people that benefited from their cycling infrastructure. In the UK, many people imagine that only a minority group of cycling enthusiasts would benefit from cycling investment but it was apparent that this is far from the truth. Safe by design, it is accessible to all ages and abilities from very young children and families, to elderly and disabled people, leading to increased independence and social inclusion across the generations. Protected routes allow people to use diverse modes of active travel, including electric bikes, powered wheelchairs and mobility scooters, cargo bikes, trailers and tag-alongs, scooters, skateboards and so on. Car free routes lead to a more pleasant walking environment, with less noise and air pollution and less exposure to road traffic danger. Active travel leads to greater social interaction, resulting in stronger community bonds. Local businesses benefit from the passing trade that can hop off and buy with great ease. Finally, each journey that is made by bicycle is one less journey that may have been made by car. The reduced congestion is beneficial to those in their cars too. The second thing that struck me was the misconception of “Dutch Style” cycling. It is often assumed that they have wide roads throughout and that segregated cycle lanes are their only tool for success. In truth they use many methods to achieve an effective Urban Mobility Plan.

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November 2014 Members meeting

As well as the usual update, Mark Leach from Bristol Green Capital Partnership tells us about ‘Cycling and the Green Capital’ and what we can expect from 2015. Our special guest speaker is Carlton Reid who is well known as creator of ipayroadtax.com, editor of BikeBiz and now author of Roads Were Not Built For Cars. Here’s the advance notice posting November meeting has talks on ‘Roads were not built for cars’ and Green Capital. Here are some notes from Carlton’s talk: Motors added to cycles first. Automobiles didn’t just appear out of thin air. Karl Benz added a motor to a…

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November meeting has talks on ‘Roads were not built for cars’ and Green Capital

Update: See the live blog (well, it was live at the time…) The November members meeting should be a particularly good one. As well as the usual update, Mark Leach from Bristol Green Capital Partnership will be talking ‘Cycling and the Green Capital’ and leading a discussion on what we can expect from 2015. We’ve then got a special guest speaker in the form of Carlton Reid who is well known as creator of ipayroadtax.com, editor of BikeBiz and now author of Roads Were Not Built For Cars.

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Annual Cyclenation-CTC conference 2014

Here’s a useful summary report of the Cyclenation/CTC/LCC conference on 22nd November.  Amongst others :  The DfT presentation was positive, comments on the Cycling Delivery Plan may be made up to 27th Nov, deadline extended. Birmingham (!) is aiming for a ‘cycling revolution’. Bristol is implementing some good work – John Richfield showed 30 years of progress. An astonishingly positive presentation from “Chris Kenyon, co-founder of CyclingWorks, explained how their campaign has demonstrated a huge amount of business support for the proposed North-South and East-West cycle superhighways in London during his inspiring presentation Waltham Forest’s “mini Holland” is moving ahead Phil Jones explained that “every highway scheme is a cycling scheme”: Welsh active travel act Brian Deegan, Principal Technical Planner at Transport for London, talked about the new London Cycling Design Standards John Dales, Director at Urban Movement, talked about the long-awaited International Cycling Best Practice Study: “Protected infra; Quiet streets; Traffic-free routes” and no gaps in provision amongst the lessons. Martin Lucas-Smith of Cambridge Cycling Campaign argued “we must avoid idea of confident and non confident cyclists. Must work for everyone. We don’t have roads for non confident drivers”. Lucy Saunders, Public Health at GLA/TfL, explained the new Local Authority health duties. Kevin Hickman and Rachel Aldred discussed Inclusive Cycling policy. Roger Geffen talked about Space4Cycling.  

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Merchant’s Dock Consultation Response

Bristol Cycling Campaign has submitted a response in support of the consultation for a wider path and a new bridge at Merchant’s Dock, by the Pump House. Our view is that this scheme will help make the centre of town more cycle friendly and will improve the existing Harbourside leisure route that is part of Quietway Q10 Promenade. We are strongly of the view that providing Space For Cycling in Bristol means a network that is largely separated from people walking or driving, except where relative speeds and volumes are low. This should be considered a leisure focussed…

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Full house at campaigners training day

BCyC hosted a very successful CTC training day for campaigners across the South West on 16th November.  There was a top team of CTC officers including inspirational Campaigns Director, Roger Geffen, Roads Justice campaigner, Rhia Weston, and Space for Cycling campaigner Robbie Gillett.  The purpose of the day was to use the examples and practical campaigning tools of the Road Justice and Space for Cycling campaigns to boost cycling provision in the South West. Of course BCyC is leading the way on both these issues and so we were able to share our experience. The final session…

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Majority of under 35s in employment in Bristol choose not to commute by car

We were sent this useful report back in the summer with the headline making point that we’ve hit a tipping point – the majority of under 35s in employment in Bristol choose not to commute by car!! 2011 Census Topic Report – Who cycles to work The analysis is by Jayne Mills of the Performance, Information and Intelligence unit in Bristol City Council and while it is published on the Bristol Council website we’ve attached it here as these things sometimes go missing 😉 Headlines: A typical person who cycles to work in Bristol…

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More irrelevant cycling ‘infrastructure’

This is a new ‘bike lane’ on the Jacobs Wells roundabout, a horrid junction for cycling.     And shameful in a city that is now calling itself a ‘Green Capital’ The problem is making a safe approach from Hotwells Road – this doesn’t solve that at all and might encourage some to use an inside lane (not safe). These lanes put the person in completely the worst position.   We think there are about three…

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Council calls for halt to 20mph speed limits

Conservative and Labour councillors in Bristol have voted to call on the mayor to stop his roll-out of 20mph speed limits on roads across the city. Here and here. However Mayor George Ferguson insisted the roll-out of Bristol’s 20mph zones should continue, saying they “decrease accidents and save lives”. This is another disturbing example of how local councillors and indeed neighbourhood partnerships fail to stand up for the vulnerable and less vocal in our communities in the face of the powerful forces of the…

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