Campaigns

Making Bristol better for cycling

Gear Change and LTN 1/20 – the start of a cycling revolution, or another false dawn?

Months, years and sometimes decades go by with only warm words and crumbs from Government on cycling. We’ve had false dawns before but on July 28 the government published two potentially revolutionary documents for cycling: Gear change: a bold vision for cycling and walking, and the less snappily titled LTN 1/20 Cycle infrastructure design. Showing commitment based on what has worked in London, in the foreword to Gear Change Boris Johnson says about cycling: It doesn’t just make you happier. It doesn’t just make you healthier. It helps millions of others too, whether or not they have any…

Read More

How a healthy streets approach will help Bristol bounce back – our July 2020 webinar [updated]

How has Bristol responded to the Covid19 crisis and how could the Healthy Streets approach aid our development of streets for people? After the success of our first webinar event (The Future of Cycling in Bristol – Webinar May 2020), we are delighted to share the recording of our July webinar. This was jointly hosted by Bristol Walking Alliance and Bristol Cycling Campaign with over 100 people attending on the night, a fantastic response. To watch the video please click here. We were really pleased with the engagement and feedback on the night, including:…

Read More

The Future of Cycling in Bristol – Webinar May 2020

Well over 100 people joined our first ever webinar on 21st May, 19:30. If you missed it settle down to catch up with this recording. At a time which feels like a proverbial ‘once in a generation’ moment for cycling we aimed to outline some specific campaigns and how we’re pressing for action on: The future of cycling in Bristol How can a Low Traffic Neighourhood approach solve many of Bristol’s issues? We present how we intend to work with the local authority to deliver high quality cycle routes which will benefit the city in the pandemic recovery period and long…

Read More

Let’s have safer streets during Covid-19

If you’ve been out during the Covid Lockdown you’ll have noticed that the proportion of folk cycling and walking compared to driving has rocketed. In some places it’s difficult to maintain social distance, while in others a small number of drivers are racing at intimidating speeds on the roads. In many cities and towns around the world quick, innovative but temporary measures are being used to make streets safe and comfortable for key workers and those shopping for essentials or exercising. This is particularly valuable for many key workers who can not afford private cars but…

Read More

Why it matters that Bristol is preparing a ‘Local Cycling and Walking Infrastructure Plan’

After intensive lobbying by cycling and walking groups the Government set up a legally binding Cycling and Walking Investment Strategy (CWIS) in 2017.  The aim is “to deliver better safety, better mobility, and better streets”. All local authorities are supposed to produce a Local Cycling and Walking Infrastructure Plan (LCWIP), setting out their long-term approach to developing local cycling and walking networks, ideally over a 10 year period. In particular this means:

a network plan for walking and cycling which identifies preferred routes and core zones for further development
a prioritised programme of infrastructure improvements for future investment
a report which sets out the underlying analysis carried out and provides a narrative which supports the identified improvements and network

Here in Bristol we’re a long way ahead of many areas, and BCyC has blazed a trail with our Bristol Cycling Manifesto with its highly influential ‘tube map’. It will be no surprise that we’ve got a long list of priorities based on our detailed network plan, so we’ve had to work hard to distill these down to some specific routes that we want Bristol and South Gloucestershire to include in their first LCWIP (yes, Gloucester Rd is #1). [Cycle Bath have been doing the same with BaNES, see here, and we don’t think North Somerset are ready yet].

Here’s the BCyC submission, also copied below, LCWIP BCyC final13.8.18. Our Space for Cycling Forum of BCyC members will be closely involved in working with council officers as plans develop. We’ll see how far we get a meaningful plan with prioritised actions. Note that the LCWIP will form an action plan appendix to the Bristol Transport Strategy that is out for public consultation on 24th September 2018, watch this space for updates.

Read More

The world, and Greater Bristol, needs more cycling champions

For all those campaigning for Space for Cycling, Brian Deegan is a hero, being the transport planning engineer who has delivered top quality infrastructure in London. But he says that without a ‘big gun’ cycling champion even skilled and committed council officers can’t transform our streets to make them more suitable to cyclists (and everyone), they can only deliver tinkering half-measures (The world needs more cycling champions). Is a cycling champion of the standard of Andrew Gillingham or Chris Boardman possible in Greater Bristol? Deegan says ‘if you can’t find one then you must make one… You will never get out…

Read More

Metro Mayor Tim Bowles is failing us

Our friends at Cycle Bath have been taking the lead locally in attempting to engage the WECA Mayor Tim Bowles. Now frustration levels have reached boiling point as we watch helplessly as other metro mayors power ahead. The words ‘chocolate teapot’ are coming to be associated with Mayor Bowles. Metro Mayor Tim Bowles is failing us For anyone that caught the news on Friday, Chris Boardman raised alarm at the lack of progress on cycling recently in the West of England. You can catch a more detailed program and discussion on it on the Sunday Politics West if…

Read More

Where is WECA’s vision for cycling?

Since the elections for the ‘Metro Mayor’ in 2017 and the setting up of the West of England Combined Authority (WECA), Bristol Cycling has been working with our friends at Cycle Bath on a Cycling Manifesto for the region. We’ve been asking for the same level of commitment from Mayor Tim Bowles, and his Transport supremo, James White, as is being seen in other cities, notably London and now Manchester where Chris Boardman is the cycling champion. Sadly there is little sign of any real vision or ambition. WECA transport policy seems to be simply about junction 18A of the M4,…

Read More

Knowing where to spend money

There is much insight to be gained from data, given the right perspective. One of the most alarming figures is that 129,000 people drive to work in the city of Bristol. Of those, 57,603 (44.6%) live within a 20 minute, 5km, bicycle ride to work. It’s worth pausing to let that sink in. Nearly half of Bristol commuter drivers live within a 20 minute bicycle ride to work. Adam Reynolds of CycleBath has emerged from sitting in a dark room with a wet towel round his head with a very practical illustration of Bristol traffic flows that won a recent Hackathon.

Read More

The Mayor wants a metro…

…to solve Bristol’s congestion problems. (More here) We wish him all the best in this. But: For a fraction of the cost and in a fraction of the time it would take to build we could have a fully protected network of cycle routes. Whatever the final outcome of the studies, Bristol needs to reduce motor traffic and increase active travel to make it a healthier and more ‘liveable’ city. And that means being radical. That means taking steps to physically prevent through traffic in our city and district centres as well as in our residential streets. And that…

Read More