Tag Archives: Space for Cycling

Space for Cycling Update: April 2019

Roadsign -'No overtaking cycists through works'

Silverthorne Lane and St Philips Marsh

We have recently met developers and consultants about the Silverthorne Lane site and St Philip’s Marsh respectively, part of Temple Quarter. These are likely to be some of the largest re-development sites in Bristol in the coming years and are in close proximity to Temple Island and the University of Bristol Temple Meads site. There is an opportunity to build cycling in at the outset and we will be working to ensure that our voice is heard at an early stage in the process.

A4018 Consultation

The initial proposals put to consultation in January were extremely poor for cycling with very little provision along a corridor that currently has few existing safe cycling routes (Safe Cycling in NW Bristol ? Yes please). We have actively engaged with officers, councilors and local schools to put forward alternative cycling improvements that would form a continuous routes to and from the north west of Bristol to the city centre. We understand a redesign is underway following consultation and we hope for some meaningful improvements to the scheme.

Muller Road

The recent proposal for increased bus priority along Muller Road has also neglected cycling. We are currently drawing up our consultation response and we hope to achieve some improvements. The priority will be improving the crossing of Muller Road by the Concord Way at Petherbridge Way:

https://bristol.citizenspace.com/growth-regeneration/muller-road-transport-improvements/

Redcliffe Way

We have had advanced sight of a proposal for a segregated cycle track along Redcliffe Way as part of a scheme to remodel the Redcliffe Hill/Way Roundabout and potential development on the existing car park. The scheme is due to go to consultation in the coming weeks or months when we will have an opportunity review the details, but in principle it seems to be another useful connection in the city centre cycling network and will improve the connections between Temple Mead, the city centre and employment sites along Redcliffe Way.

LCWIP

The Local Cycling and Walking and Infrastructure Plan (LCWIP) continues to progress and officers are currently auditing the cycling routes to identify the improvements required and prioritise them for future funding. We understand that of the Local Authorities developing LCWIPs, Bristol is the most advanced which will put Bristol in a good position to bid for future funding to construct the schemes.

University of Bristol

We have recently met with representatives from the University of Bristol to discuss how cycling infrastructure could be improved around their existing sites and also their new campus at Temple Meads. Initial conversations have been constructive so we hope we can work to improve provision for their students, staff and other residents in these areas.

WECA Joint Local Transport Plan Consultation

So we know our new West of England Combined Authority (WECA), and our new metro Mayor, Conservative Tim Bowles, will soon be celebrating being two years old. What are they for? Well they currently have a Consultation on a plan for transport (called the JLTP) throughout the region up to 2036.

Wow an opportunity to make our streets safe and healthy for people and kids. Reduce motor dependency, clean up air quality and create green space; well may be not. The author of the JLTP probably spent their childhood playing Grand Theft Auto in a dark place, not messing about on a bike. Certainly there’s much more emphasis on Airliners and Motorway junctions than people and mobility.

Click here for the transport simulator  

True, there’s something for everyone but it could have been so much more. Frankly it’s the sort of document which might have been written in the Sixties. That’s a missed opportunity when elsewhere Highway Authorities have entered the Twenty First Century with plans to restrict non essential car travel to enable access for essential vehicles. We’ve met with Officers, failing to get any commitments, but it is early days.

JLTP Plan

We must engage with the process. In the Bristol Transport Strategy consultation last year the main response was “cycling improvements” so thanks to everyone who supported us. Let’s see if we can do as well this time. The Consultation response is a Simulator which allows you to buy extra points (eg by supporting congestion charging) and then spend them. Please give maximum (5) points to the following two questions which are the nearest to calling for a comprehensive, safe cycle network;

  • Create a comprehensive and safe network, so active travel is the preferred choice for shorter trips and for accessing public transport
  • Reallocate highway space to public transport, walking and cycling, where appropriate

There are another three questions to which we would also give maximum points, to reduce motor dominance;

  • Use mechanisms to reduce dependency on private car use in urban areas, e.g. charging, parking restrictions
  • Restrict the most polluting vehicles from areas of poor air quality
  • Improve road safety by designing for and imposing appropriate speed limits, improving driver behaviour and providing training for different road users

In the general comments at the end please call for a comprehensive, continuous cycle route network, separate from motors, including buses, and pedestrians. Thanks you for taking time to support our efforts by using this Simulator.

Safe Cycling in NW Bristol ? Yes please

Want to cycle from Clifton to Henbury along a safe segregated cycle route? No we’re not joking; we don’t mean messy, sub standard national cycle route 4 but a new route along Westbury Rd, Falcondale Rd and Passage Rd, protected from motors. There is currently a consultation on new bus lanes on the A4018, which don’t seem popular locally. It’s not ambitious on cycling either; a new route on the Downs and, perhaps, traffic reduction in Westbury Village. Our meetings with Council Officers suggest, however, they’re seriously interested in a AAA (all ages and abilities) cycle route so may be something good can come of it.

 

But it’s early days. You can help; we have to get support. If you want your kids to cycle to school in North West Bristol or just fewer monster SUVs on the school run. Or you want some of the thousands of people who’ll live in the new homes to be built on Filton Airfield to travel to work in Bristol by bike, not by car. Or you just want to cycle around Westbury safely. Or you think, like most Bristolians, more cycling is good for our city, our health and the air we breath. In all these cases please complete the A4018 Consultation

Most of the questions concern buses and cars, people will have their own views on those, but three are important for cycling so feel free to adopt our answers;

Qu 4 (Cycle path on Downs beside Westbury Road ) Strongly agree – Comment “Please ensure the Path is segregated rather than shared use”

Qu 6 (Westbury Village) Please strongly support the reductions in rat running and restrictions on motor traffic.

Qu 8 (Cycling Improvements) – Comment “Please install a continuous cycle route, along Passage Road, Falcondale Road and Westbury Road. The route should be segregated, from cars, buses, and pedestrians wherever possible and shared use otherwise. Please also improve Parrys Lane.”

Our full response for those interested in the detail.

Why it matters that Bristol is preparing a ‘Local Cycling and Walking Infrastructure Plan’

After intensive lobbying by cycling and walking groups the Government set up a legally binding Cycling and Walking Investment Strategy (CWIS) in 2017.  The aim is “to deliver better safety, better mobility, and better streets”. All local authorities are supposed to produce a Local Cycling and Walking Infrastructure Plan (LCWIP), setting out their long-term approach to developing local cycling and walking networks, ideally over a 10 year period. In particular this means:

  • a network plan for walking and cycling which identifies preferred routes and core zones for further development
  • a prioritised programme of infrastructure improvements for future investment
  • a report which sets out the underlying analysis carried out and provides a narrative which supports the identified improvements and network

Here in Bristol we’re a long way ahead of many areas, and BCyC has blazed a trail with our Bristol Cycling Manifesto with its highly influential ‘tube map’. It will be no surprise that we’ve got a long list of priorities based on our detailed network plan, so we’ve had to work hard to distill these down to some specific routes that we want Bristol and South Gloucestershire to include in their first LCWIP (yes, Gloucester Rd is #1). [Cycle Bath have been doing the same with BaNES, see here, and we don’t think North Somerset are ready yet].

Here’s the BCyC submission, also copied below, LCWIP BCyC final13.8.18. Our Space for Cycling Forum of BCyC members will be closely involved in working with council officers as plans develop. We’ll see how far we get a meaningful plan with prioritised actions. Note that the LCWIP will form an action plan appendix to the Bristol Transport Strategy that is out for public consultation on 24th September 2018, watch this space for updates.

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Induced Traffic and Traffic Evaporation

The recent debate on the proposed Callington “Relief” Road has brought the concept of “induced traffic” back into the limelight. And also the the related and much neglected evidence for “reduced traffic“, or the delightful concept of “traffic evaporation”. So what do these terms mean?

Induced Traffic

As car ownership and use have increased over the past 30 years the reaction to the pressure created by additional traffic demand has often been to increase the level of supply, in other words, provide additional road space. There is a growing body of evidence indicating that the benefits of creating additional road capacity are not as significant as was previously believed. In many cases, the provision of new road links simply increases congestion problems. This occurs through a process that is known as traffic ‘induction’. In 1994, the UK Government-commissioned Sactra report provided evidence on the impact of new road building on traffic levels in the area of the scheme. The report revealed that when new road capacity is provided, overall traffic levels in the vicinity of the scheme actually increase. The evidence does not offer a reliable means of predicting the extent of this traffic increase but case studies suggest that it is typically around 10 % in the short term, and 20 % in the longer term. In our cities, such as Bristol, there is an additional reason as to why the provision of additional road capacity is problematic for city planners — there is simply a lack of available space in which to expand.

Two recent reports from the Campaign to Protect Rural England on “the Impact of Road Projects in England” and “The End of the Road, Challenging the Road Building Consensus” discuss the latest evidence on the failure of road building projects to do anything more than attract more cars, increasing noise, air pollution and accidents. There is also is sound research evidence to back the benefits and impacts of pedestrian improvements and road closures as set out in the new website from the UWE Centre for Transport and Society.

Traffic Evaporation

So if building or widening roads causes more traffic, what happens when capacity is restricted or redirected? Chaos, surely? Well the evidence points to something else, something that unexpected, a phenomenon that has been called traffic evaporation, disappearing traffic, traffic suppression, or, more generally, reduced demand. The fact is that some traffic is displaced to other modes, and some simply vanishes, with no seeming inconvenience or disruption.

Case Study – Wolverhampton Town Centre

This case study examines a response to intense traffic congestion, worsening environmental conditions and declining economic activity in Wolverhampton in the face of competition from other shopping centres in the city of Telford to the west, and the Merry Hill complex to the south-east, and additional planned retail centres. In 1986, the local authority commissioned ‘The Black Country Integrated Transport study’ which concluded that building more roads would not solve the growing transport problems.

A more effective strategy would be to give greater priority to public transport and to put greater emphasis on improving the urban environment by creating an attractive physical space that would meet the public’s expectations. The response was a four-stage strategy, central to which was the removal of approximately 8 000 through-traffic cars per day from the city centre. The predicted traffic congestion did not occur. A significant percentage of traffic appears to have disappeared from the city centre, a result which could not be solely explained by displacement to other routes.

Below we’ve put together a short storyboard showing how the theories of induced traffic and traffic evaporation play out in reality.

The concept of “Induced Traffic” and “Traffic Evaporation”

Download our handout from the Callington Road meeting: 

Induced traffic and evaporation

 

 

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