Some successful campaigning on this scheme resulted in the inclusion of a cycle contraflow on Lower Redland Road and some 1.5m wide red tarmac through the signalised pinch point crossing.

 

 

 

 

What we were really looking for was something wide enough to deter mororists from overtaking cyclists during this rather narrow piece of road, that being uphill, adds to the cyclist’s wobble factor, perhaps something like this from East Lothian that makes it clear that the cycling space takes up almost the entire lane and leaves no room for overtaking.

 

 

 

 

 

 Even in these more enlightened parts of the country though they didnn’t always get it right. This red strip is not wide enough to deter overtaking and has now had a sign added to emphasise the intention – but Bristol doesn’t like signage aka “street clutter”!

 

 

 

 

 

 

The design statement said “Minimum 1.5 metres red strip maximised to available space” or something like that, so we ended up with – the minimum. At least they listened, but the officers clearly need more support on order to be bolder and resist the minimum and instead go for cycling infrastructure that will be appealing to anyone, aged “8 to 80” to want to cycle. It would be interesting to know whether anecdotal evidence that cycling on Whiteladies Road has decreased as a result of the GBBN cycling “Improvements” (this was a a saparate school safety scheme) is supported by empirical measurement.

Additional info on Cyclescape