Tag Archives: Shared Space

Bristol University Tyndall Avenue public realm changes – our response

Bristol University are proposing to ‘stop up’ Tyndall Place including the junctions at either end as part of their master plan. Here’s our view.

Response to Consultation (BCyCResponsetoTyndallAvenue)
Bristol Cycling Campaign
23 February 2017
Tyndall Avenue Public Realm Project

www.bristol.ac.uk/estates/projects/tyndallplace/

Our overall position on this consultation is: Support with strong qualification

Space for Cycling Does this measure deliver 1) Protected space on main roads; 2) Remove through motor traffic; 3) Safe routes to school; 4) Cycle friendly town centres; 5) Cycle routes in green spaces; 6) 20mph speed limits?

Amber – overall neutral

Road Danger Reduction Does this measure seek a genuine reduction in danger for all road users by identifying and controlling the principal sources of threat?

Green – overall benefit

Triple A Quality Will this measure be attractive to all ages and abilities using all kinds of cycles? This means ‘Triple A’ quality for All Ages and Abilities

Amber – overall neutral

Strategic Cycling Network How does this measure contribute to the development of a planned, integrated and coherent strategic cycle network? Green – overall benefit
Cycle-proofing How far does this measure provide for Triple A Space for Cycling in the future? Green – overall benefit

The Bristol Cycling Campaign welcomes many aspects of the proposals to redesign Tyndall Avenue as a public space which is wider, greener, and free of cars and buses. These proposals could produce significant benefits for the University and the City, in terms of well-being, in providing a clear physical focus for the University, and in drawing the public to the Royal Fort Gardens.

However our approval is subject to a major caveat. It is important that cyclists retain the use of Tyndall Avenue as of right, a right which is not subject to possible future removal by the University.  It is not enough to have a broad statement that “Cyclists will still be allowed to pass through Tyndall Avenue after it is pedestrianised” (Tyndall Avenue Public Realm Project Consultation Document p.8).

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Shared Space

In relatively quiet spaces where competition for space is not an issue sharing can be relaxed, convenient and sociable. When pedestrian or cycle traffic is heavy (even for shorts periods) shared space provokes anxiety and avoidance. Layouts and marked routes for cyclists should be clearly laid out and easy for all to follow and pedestrians to notice. Particular attention should be paid to consistent design of signalised crossings where many cyclists and pedestrians and cyclist might be waiting together at peak periods. BCyC Policy – Shared Space Streets and Shared Use Pavements

Campaign to keep Prince St Bridge for people walking and cycling

Prince Street Bridge is possible the most important single point in the city for walking and cycling. It is very heavily used and already a point of significant congestion. This will get worse as ever more people choose to walk and cycle.

It is clear that it can no longer continue to function safely and comfortably while meeting the needs of walking, cycling and motor traffic. Something has to give.

We’ve launched a petition for a one year trial of a proper design for walking and cycling. It’s been closed to motor traffic for six months so we know the city can cope.

There is a consultation on Prince Street out now to create a proper All Ages and Abilities (Triple A) route from Cumberland Road to the Centre, but it gives up at Prince St Bridge (and also doesn’t link to Gaol Ferry Bridge).

There’s a ‘plotting’ meeting for everyone who wants to make this happen on Weds 20th July, 5.45pm at Roll for the Soul. Come along!

Here’s the text of the petition

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Huge response to Space for Cycling survey

We have had over 600 responses to our survey on what people think about cycling in Bristol.

Most responses were from those who cycle regularly, 73% cycle more than 3 times a week, and the main motivations were for excecise and pleasure, commuting, and concern for environment

There is strong support for removing motor traffic from shopping areas to create ‘Living Hearts’. and 3 out of 4 saya there’s not enough secure cycle parking. People want police to priortise cycle theft.

in 20mph local areas half support further traffic slowing measures, but others feel these don’t help cycling and cause other problems. Removing though traffic and favouring residents is popular.

In 30mph areas a whopping 85%+ want PROTECTED cycle lanes and separate cyclelanes around roundabouts and major junctions, with over 70% wanting priority to pedestrians and cyclists at junctions.

In general there is strong support for the 6 main asks behind our Space for Cycling campaign. We’re launching the 2016 phase in March ready for the May elections.

Details of what needs doing is clearly set out in these Three guides to Space for Cycling.

Here are some of the things people said:

  • “We need plenty of cycle parking. On a wet autumn day I struggled to find a free stand in Broadmead. There is only designated cycle parking space at the top and the bottom of Park Street.”
  • “I’m all for reduuction in cars and through traffic. I also drive, but I have no need to travel at high speeds unless I’m on a motor way”
  • “I honestly have no idea how to make it safer other than giving cyclist a safer route that avoids it entirely. I’m looking at you Lawrence Hill Roundabout! You scary son of a bitch.”
  • “Separate cycle ways will only work if they are joined up – you have to be able to get on and off in the right places easily, or they just won’t be used.”
  • “A white line on a pavement is not cycle infrastructure. Cannot stand this cop out cheap solution as it is dangerous, hated by cyclists and pedestrians alike. The only group who win are car drivers.”
  • “Bristol is still confusing in the way cycle lanes integrate with the rest of the world… Turning on and off sometimes and disappearing. This is very noticeable when I have taken my children cycling and have tried to enable them in use of cycle lanes for safe cycling but it’s hard to communicate the elaborate thought processes I can do as an adult cyclist around the more confusing streets of Bristol! But I love that it’s always improving and that cyclists have more space and there is more awareness of our needs we just need more to enable people who are too scared of the roads to join us.”
  • “Cycle infrastructure in Bristol is poor quality and disjointed. Most are just footpaths, many are unsafe to ride on and cyclists are always lowest priority at junctions. Signage for cycle paths are unclear and lead to confusion and conflict.”
  • “I am a keen cyclist..but never really fancy cycling in Bristol.. it’s far too congestred and shared space with cars is so dangerous. I really don’t quite understand the reason Bristol got to be a Green capital!”
  • “I do not approve entirely of segregation between cars & bikes. I took some free cycling lessons with my local council and know it’s possible to cycle safely in traffic if you position yourself properly, especially when making turns. More awareness and education for cyclists & drivers rather than giving anyone preferences to fuel animosity would be an ideal solution.”
  • “In the UK/Bristol, I find that both people on bicycles (I don’t call myself a cyclist as it implies lycra, a hi-vis-vest, a helmet and annoying flashy lights) and people in cars have quite a misunderstanding about their responsibility to general road safety. As long as there is not an established road design including separated lanes the roads have to be shared in a sensible way. Education from young age is the key in this. I’d say to take countries like The Netherlands and Denmark as a proper example on bicycle friendly road design. It’s not necessary to reinvent the wheel in the UK.”
  • “Lack of continuous cycle lanes is awful. I lived in Holland, and the separated cycle lanes were amazing. I felt incredibly safe and cycled EVERYWHERE to the point where when I moved to Bristol I had to relearn how to walk!”
  • “Where routes popular with cyclists are too narrow to accommodate cycle lanes, I feel we should start removing parking places as a possible solution. We need to stop being so precious about parking spaces.”

Joint Spatial Plan and Joint Transport Study – our response

These two major strategic plans will shape some profound changes to our city and towns over the coming years. The four West of England councils (Bristol, South Gloucestershire, North Somerset, Bath & North East Somerset) together are working on a draft Joint Spatial Plan setting out how the area will accomodate 85,000 new homes and growth of 20%. The companion Joint Transport Study will shape how people travel, and whether we achieve the Bristol Cycle Campaign vision of ‘a city where cycling is so easy that everyone does it’.

There’s many good words, as you’d expect they take account of the Bristol Cycle Strategy, and the Draft South Gloucestershire Cycle Strategy. Overall however we feel they’re in danger of rushing up the ‘business as usual’ path.

Our full response is here: 2016-29-01JointSpatialPlanTransportStudy.

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