The Future of Cycling in Bristol – Webinar May 2020

Well over 100 people joined our first ever webinar on 21st May, 19:30. If you missed it settle down to catch up with this recording. At a time which feels like a proverbial ‘once in a generation’ moment for cycling we aimed to outline some specific campaigns and how we’re pressing for action on: The future of cycling in Bristol How can a Low Traffic Neighourhood approach solve many of Bristol’s issues? We present how we intend to work with the local authority to deliver high quality cycle routes which will benefit the city in the pandemic recovery period and long…

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Local Cycling & Walking Infrastructure Plan Consultation

The West of England Combined Authority (WECA) – remember them, Metro Mayor, Tim Bowles? – have shown scant interest in active travel. But they have now put out a Local Cycling and Walking Infrastructure Plan (LCWIP) for a consultation which closed on 15 March 2020. This is important as the LCWIP is the only game in town for cycling improvements in Bristol and the surrounding area. It’s a mixed bag – quite a few protected cycleways proposed, but many shared paths etc. Also lots of “explore” this and “consider” that; very tentative. We expected this plan to set…

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Update: City Centre Cycle Network

Bristol Cycling (BCyc) have recently been engaging with Bristol City Council (BCC) officers about the city centre cycle network. A lot has happened in the last few years so now is a good time for an update on some recent and upcoming schemes: The Prince Street cycle track has been fully open for a few months, is very well used and is functioning pretty well. BCyc raised a few queries about some elements of the design and we hope that action will be taken on these where possible as well as lessons learned for future schemes. Minor snags aside, overall…

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Road Rage on Nelson Street

If you’ve had problems riding this road please let us know If you’re cycling along Nelson Street perhaps you should wear a flak jacket or, at least, a GoPro camera. In the last couple of months two of our members have reported road rage incidents involving buses and bikes. A bit of an uneven battle you might think 15 tons against 15 kilos. Double decker buses pick on someone your own size! But this is serious; someone might get hurt. Observations by our members suggest that these incidents are the tip of the iceberg, with many other cyclists suffering similar…

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Induced Traffic and Traffic Evaporation

The recent debate on the proposed Callington “Relief” Road has brought the concept of “induced traffic” back into the limelight. And also the the related and much neglected evidence for “reduced traffic“, or the delightful concept of “traffic evaporation”. So what do these terms mean? Induced Traffic As car ownership and use have increased over the past 30 years the reaction to the pressure created by additional traffic demand has often been to increase the level of supply, in other words, provide additional road space. There is a growing body of evidence indicating that the benefits of…

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Manifesto for Council Candidates – May 2016

We have produced a BCyC Manifesto for 2016 Council Elections candidates setting out key questions for the elections on May 5th. This is part of our Space for Cycling campaign. You can add your voice to the campaign by signing the petition. See also our manifesto for candidates standing for the Mayor, and for the Police and Crime Commissioner. Manifesto for Council Candidates Cycling is good for Bristol – and more cycling is better 8 in 10 people want Bristol to be better for cycling Cycling in Bristol means sharing space with intimidating motor traffic, or with…

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Huge response to Space for Cycling survey

We have had over 600 responses to our survey on what people think about cycling in Bristol. Most responses were from those who cycle regularly, 73% cycle more than 3 times a week, and the main motivations were for excecise and pleasure, commuting, and concern for environment There is strong support for removing motor traffic from shopping areas to create ‘Living Hearts’. and 3 out of 4 saya there’s not enough secure cycle parking. People want police to priortise cycle theft. in 20mph local areas half support further traffic slowing measures, but others feel these don’t help cycling and cause other…

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Separation between pedestrians and cyclists in a ‘Living Heart’

Guest blog from member WJH I suspect we could be in danger of being sold a pup by agreeing to the Living Heart separation proposals. The general principle of separation is good, even essential, for reasonably fast cycle travel. Broadmead is a problem, and the proposal is good, especially if they add cycle stands near the central cross roads, and if the contraflow is sensibly arranged, but many continental cities do have pedestrian areas in which cycles and people on foot mix quite happily. For example, mixing seems to work well in these areas: Grenoble– old town pedestrian…

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More Separation Between Pedestrians & Cyclists

Update 28/02/2014: Article in the Bristol Post. The Living Heart campaign has issued the following statement which has been endorsed by us at BCyC, with the caveat that we don’t want to see any No Cycling signs, preferring that desirable routes are signed to encourage cycles away from crowded pedestrian areas (such as Broadmead).   The Living Heart for Bristol has called for a change of policy on the sharing or separation of cyclists and pedestrians.  The Living Heart includes pedestrian and cycling organisations amongst its members.  As the Council is examining new plans for The Centre,…

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