Tag Archives: Railway Path

Bristol Cycling Campaign response to the Bristol & Bath Railway Path concept designs

Bristol Cycling Campaign response to Bristol & Bath Railway Path concept designs

Update: 23 January 2019

Sustrans is holding a drop-in session ‘to explore the latest designs and to help us balance the different ideas as we develop the details together’ for the railway path. Details for the session are:

Monday 24 February
5:00pm-8:00pm
Easton Community Centre, Kilburn Street, Easton, Bristol BS5 6AW (next to the BBRP)

Bristol Cycling Campaign response

The Bristol & Bath Railway Path is an important asset for local cycling. Increasing use of the Railway Path (by cyclists and pedestrians) has led to calls for a reduction in conflict between pedestrians and cyclists. Sustrans is using Department for Transport funding for ‘a community-led re-design to improve the quality of the existing Bristol and Bath railway path’.

The work is to be undertaken at the Bristol end of the Railway Path between Clay Bottom and Trinity Street.

Bristol Cycling Campaign has significant concerns over some of the proposals contained in the concept designs created by Sustrans. We have submitted a comprehensive document to Sustrans which provides our feedback on the proposals.

We regard the east Bristol section of the Railway Path as the most important cycling infrastructure in the City and welcome steps to improve the Railway Path for all users. Bristol Cycling Campaign believes the route should be widened throughout the busy section of the park to facilitate the separation of cycles and pedestrians. However the concept designs created to date do not propose this.

We are objecting to a series of proposed obstacles that will hinder, rather than help, cycling on the Railway Path, and we regret that many opportunities to improve the Railway Path were not included in the proposals, such as reinstating the footbridge next to Whitehall Primary connecting Johnsons Rd and Bruce Rd.

We are hopeful that our concerns about the proposals for the Railway Path are taken into consideration rather than the proposed anti-cycling measures implemented.

You can read about the Sustrans Concept Designs and our response in the PDFs:

sustrans-bbrp-concept-designs-december2019

BCyC-Response-to-Sustrans-BBRP-Proposals-06012020

Workshops on changes to the Railway Path – have your say!

Sustrans have funding to improve the Bristol end of the Railway Path between Trinity Road and Clay Bottom. The £1.2m project is being called the One Path: BS5 project and “aims to encourage positive behaviour and tackle issues such as conflict between path users”. It is funded by the Department for Transport and will be delivered by Sustrans in partnership with Bristol City Council.

Hooray!

But hold on there. There’s a line of thought that what’s needed are speed bumps, bollards, and chicanes. What do you think needs to be done?

There are four events coming up to find out what the local community and path users think about the path. We would like lots of BCyC supporters to have your say, so please get stuck in. There’s also an email list and facebook group.

  • Thursday 17 October, 5:00 – 7:00 pm at Hannah Moore’s School, St. Philips
  • Friday 18 October, 3:30 – 6:30 pm at Easton Community Centre
  • Monday 21 October, 3:30 – 7:00 pm at Rose Green Centre

There will also be a community inception meeting on Friday 18 October, 7:00 pm at Easton Community Centre

There appears to be under representation of the cycling users voice because engaging with bike riders on the path, who are often heading to work etc, reluctant to stop, is more difficult than pedestrians.

We want segregation of people on bikes and on foot, but that will mean a determined effort to secure sufficient width. That is better for both categories of user in accordance with the policies of both walking and cycling advocacy groups. Following discussion on our members’ Space for Cycling forum, we concluded that we do NOT want bollards, chicanes etc or anything which will reduce cycling leading to more motoring etc and discriminates against the disabled including disabled cyclists.

Sustrans say the project will be guided by the community’s vision:

“We are committed to a Bristol and Bath Railway Path that is a safe space: a park, path and place for all users, by foot or by wheel, enabling healthy lifestyles in a green and biodiverse corridor linking the two Cities and communities across the West of England Combined Authority.”

“We will work with all of the communities who use the Bristol and Bath Railway Path to redesign and reshape it so that its value to people, wildlife, its localities and the region as a whole is enhanced and protected for generations to come.”

“To help guide the project, and ensure a healthy balance between the interests and needs of all users, we will be setting up a stakeholder group. During the workshops, we will be inviting attendees to put their name forward to be part of the project stakeholder group. Please consider this carefully in advance of the meeting, and let us know if you feel this is something you would be happy to do.”

The start of cycle campaigning in Bristol, lessons for today?

It’s well worth settling down with the hot beverage of your choice and letting the estimable John Grimshaw tell you about the start of cycle campaigning in Bristol, and we venture, in the UK.

He describes the striking series of demonstrations and actions that started in 1974 and lead to the Bristol Bath Railway Path in 1978, spawning Sustrans (1983) and the predecessor of Bristol Cycling Campaign, CycleBag (1977), on the way.

While you’re listening you might wish to browse the first Bristol cycling strategy, 1974 Cycling in Bristol from John Grimshaw. The maps are hard to make out but the links to our 2013 Bristol Cycling Strategy are clear.

Cycling around Yate – the Spur and other routes

The new Yate Spur cycle path opened in April 2018 providing a shared use route between the Bristol and Bath railway path at Coxgrove Hill and Station Road, Yate. BCyC has been pressing for this for many years and it formed part of the Strategic Cycle Network we proposed in 2013 so it’s great to have it in place. Have you used it yet?

BCyC members have been active in the Yate Joint Cycleways Group which has been a strong advocate for the Spur, and for the other links and routes that Yate needs. There is a meeting of the JCG on Tuesday 17th July at Town Council Offices, Poole Court, Yate to plan for the next stage. Ideas and actions will be taken forward through the South Gloucestershire Cycle Forum. Our diary page has further details of this meeting as well other meetings and rides.

Here’s what the JCG works for:

The Joint Cycleways Group represents cycling interests in the parishes of Dodington, Yate, Sodbury and Westerleigh, Iron Acton and Pucklechurch. Its members are representatives of the local councils, local cycling organisations and local cyclists. Its regular meetings are attended by South Glos officers and it is recognised as the local body that proposes priorities for cycling strategy and cycling improvement schemes in the area. The JCG also deals with accessibility issues and joint use paths

Our neighbourhood plan for the area sets out our key ambitions South Glos – Rural: Almondsbury, Thornbury, Westerleigh, Yate

Chocolate Factory in Greenbank

Generator (Chocolate Factory) LLP has submitted a full planning application, under reference 15/06400/F to Bristol City Council for the redevelopment of the former Elizabeth Shaw Chocolate Factory in Greenbank. The details are on their website at http://www.chocolatefactorybristol.com/downloads.aspx.

  • 138 new homes, in a mix of houses and apartments
  • 142 new car parking spaces for residential and commercial uses
  • A new landscaped public open space, linking the wider Greenbank neighbourhood with the Bristol & Bath Railway Path
  • An independent retail/cafe unit
  • Flexible workshop units for creative enterprises
  • A refurbished building for community & commercial use

Bristol Cycling Campaign has submitted detailed a detailed response highlighting the lack of cycle parking and shortcomings in the travel plan.

Read more ...

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