Tag Archives: ‘Triple A’ Quality

Call for inclusive infrastructure

Fantastic article by Zoe Banks Gross on why we need to continue campaigning for a better environment for cycling, if we want to see greater quantities and diversity of people cycling in Bristol: https://betterbybike.info/news/seeing-women-cycling-bristol-theres-still-long-way-go.

Cycling is for everyone, and even though we are seeing more women cycling in Bristol, and more than in the other Bike Life cities, we still have a long way to go for cycling to be an easy choice for everyone. Bristol urgently needs better infrastructure to make it simpler and safer for all types of people on cycles, whether they are passengers in a cargo bike, parents with panniers full of groceries, or those on specially adapted tricycles.

Can we also encourage everyone to pause, read and share this important article by @Sandi_Dheensa What it’s like cycling as a woman of colour. This explains why the key issue for cycle campaigning in Bristol is enabling everyday cycle use for women, BAME, children and all abilities. A city that works for these groups works for everyone.

BAME people are a disproportionately small percentage of those who cycle. […] But what happens when we do venture into the cycling world? From my own (albeit novice and still wobbly) experience, I worry that as well as the ubiquitous hazards of careless drivers and meagre cycle lanes, women of colour are vulnerable to verbal abuse, beyond levels that white people, men, and of course, white men, are likely to experience.

It goes without saying that changing prejudiced attitudes to women of colour and cyclists, never mind women of colour who cycle, is a difficult feat. So what can we do?

For one, we can put pressure on authority figures to improve infrastructure. About women of colour, Zoe says, “if you build it, they will come”. But in his State of the City address this month, Bristol mayor Marvin Rees made no mention of cycling infrastructure, instead talking about his controversial £2.5 billion mass-transit system project. I hope that he pays attention to voices like Zoe’s, who argues that “giving space back to people would help make getting around the city easier and friendlier.”  She continued, “if we’re walking or cycling, it’s so much easier to engage and interact with people. That’s what we need more of right now in these difficult times we’re living in.” I wholeheartedly agree.

Victoria Park – JIMBY’s and NIMBY’s

 Update: Planning application withdrawn for ‘further consultation’. We will continue to press for ‘triple A’ ambition to make cycling feel possible for All Ages and Abilities.


The consultation has now closed on the planning application for the Victoria Park section of the Filwood Quietway (however comments can still be made, use link here Victoria Park – say no to Project Fear). There are 1065 comments with a breakdown of about 56% objectors and 44% supporters (thanks to Kit Wallace for analysis).

Interestingly, but not surprisingly, 85% of those living within 1km object. Those further away, and therefore more likely to consider cycling, are 82% in favour [updated 15/1/17].

We believe the proposals will improve Victoria Park overall and benefit everyone, walking or cycling, local or enjoying passing through, a real win-win. It will now be down to local councillors on the planning committee to decide how much weight to give local opposition when it goes against the wider interests of the City.

If you think this is contentious, wait until the proposals for Space for Cycling on Gloucester Road are put forward…

On a curious side note, in the review of 20mph areas in Bristol, the issue is ‘Just in My Back Yard’ or JIMBYism. Drivers are willing to curtail their speed where it matters personally, but revert to a habitual, faster speed where the benefits to themselves are less tangible.  People want 20mph on their street so that it is safe for their children, their cats, their grannies but they don’t want to have to comply with 20mph limits in other people’s streets! Similarly, really good ‘Triple A’ cycling provision (All Ages and Abilities) that will attract and encourage more cycling is popular across the city, but changes are often vigorously opposed locally.

If you have a moment there are some very high quality and thoughtful comments. We’ve picked out a selection:

Read more ...

Campaign to keep Prince St Bridge for people walking and cycling

Prince Street Bridge is possible the most important single point in the city for walking and cycling. It is very heavily used and already a point of significant congestion. This will get worse as ever more people choose to walk and cycle.

It is clear that it can no longer continue to function safely and comfortably while meeting the needs of walking, cycling and motor traffic. Something has to give.

We’ve launched a petition for a one year trial of a proper design for walking and cycling. It’s been closed to motor traffic for six months so we know the city can cope.

There is a consultation on Prince Street out now to create a proper All Ages and Abilities (Triple A) route from Cumberland Road to the Centre, but it gives up at Prince St Bridge (and also doesn’t link to Gaol Ferry Bridge).

There’s a ‘plotting’ meeting for everyone who wants to make this happen on Weds 20th July, 5.45pm at Roll for the Soul. Come along!

Here’s the text of the petition

Read more ...

Manifesto for Mayoral Candidates – May 2016

We have produced a Manifesto for 2016 Mayoral Elections setting out key questions for the elections on May 5th. This is part of our Space for Cycling campaign. You can add your voice to the campaign by signing the petition. See also our manifesto for candidates standing for the Council, and for the Police and Crime Commissioner.

Manifesto for Mayoral Candidates

  • Cycling is good for Bristol – and more cycling is better

  • 8 in 10 people want Bristol to be better for cycling

  • Two thirds of people consider cycling too risky for them

  • People want protection from intimidating motor traffic

  • Sharing with pedestrians can be uncomfortable for both

  • Bristol aims to achieve 20% cycling by 2020 with huge benefits for all

  • The only proven way to deliver this is to provide a continuous and dedicated cycling network, to Triple A standards – for All Ages and Abilities.

Our Mayor and council must have a transforming vision for cycling, and the political will to make it easy for our choices to be good for us and good for our city. We are calling on candidates to create Space for Cycling, for the benefit of everyone.

Questions for Candidates on specific priorities

  1. Will you create protected Space for Cycling on the Gloucester Rd?

  2. Will you support a Living Heart for Bristol by removing through motor traffic from Anchor Rd, Park St, Haymarket, Baldwin St and Prince St?

  3. Will you set up a Space for Cycling Inner Loop connecting Clifton Triangle, St James Barton, Temple Circus, Redcliffe roundabout, new Arnolfini Bridge and Jacob’s Wells roundabout?

General Questions for Candidates

  1. Will you plan to Get Bristol Moving by making the best use of the limited capacity of our streets and roads so that 80% of trips can be healthy and sustainable (40% walking, 20% public transport, and 20% cycling)?

  2. Will you prioritise Funding for Cycling with sustained investment of £16 per head, and an aspiration for £25 per head? Also ensure that 10% of the council transport budget delivers clear benefits for cycling.

  3. Will you open up our Streets for All through a ‘good transport plan’ in every neighbourhood? Residential areas should have low speeds, continuous pavements across side streets, no rat running and all streets open for cycling.

  4. Will you take every opportunity to create Space for Cycling on busy or fast roads and junctions, with ‘Triple A’ standards for All Ages and Abilities, so that there are safe routes to school, to work, to shop, and to green spaces?

  5. Will you plan for Living Hearts for the centre and our neighbourhoods? This means public spaces at the centres of our neighbourhoods where people are the priority, and are not dominated by through motor traffic.

Manifesto for Council Candidates – May 2016

We have produced a BCyC Manifesto for 2016 Council Elections candidates setting out key questions for the elections on May 5th. This is part of our Space for Cycling campaign. You can add your voice to the campaign by signing the petition. See also our manifesto for candidates standing for the Mayor, and for the Police and Crime Commissioner.

Manifesto for Council Candidates

  • Cycling is good for Bristol – and more cycling is better
  • 8 in 10 people want Bristol to be better for cycling
  • Cycling in Bristol means sharing space with intimidating motor traffic, or with pedestrians. No-one is happy
  • Two thirds of people consider cycling too risky for them
  • Bristol has a target to achieve 20% cycling by 2020 with profound benefits to wellbeing, congestion, environment and prosperity
  • The only proven way to deliver this is to provide a continuous and dedicated cycling network, to Triple A standards – for All Ages and Abilities.

Our councillors must work to help create an environment whereby it is easier for us to make choices that are good for us, good for our neighbourhood, and good for our city. We are calling on candidates and councillors to support Space for Cycling, for the benefit of everyone.

Questions for Candidates on specific priorities

  1. Will you work to make your ward and neighbourhood a better place to cycle and walk, so that people can travel safely to work, to school, to shop, to play, and to green spaces?

  2. Will you do all you can to deliver the specific improvement in your ward identified at bristolcyclingcampaign.org.uk/wards?

General Questions for Candidates

  1. Will you support and help produce a good transport plan for your ward and neighbourhood which puts people first, and particularly the young, the old and the disadvantaged? Streets for All in residential areas means low speeds, continuous pavements across side streets, no rat running or through traffic, and all streets open for cycling, including one-way contraflows.

  2. Will you press for Space for Cycling in your ward generally? This means protected space on high volume and 30mph roads and at busy junctions. It means accepting no less than ‘Triple A’ standards of design, construction & maintenance, for All Ages and Abilities. It means having safe routes to school, to work, to shops, and to green spaces.

  3. Will you work towards a Living Heart for your neighbourhood? This means public spaces that are not dominated by through motor traffic, that have plenty of cycle parking and where people are the priority, not traffic.

  4. Do you recognise that some changes will be controversial and will you stand up for those with most to gain but whose voices are often not heard – the young, the old and the disadvantaged?

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