Campaigns

Making Bristol better for cycling

Space for Cycling autumn update

Local Cycling and Walking Infrastructure Plan (LCWIP) Over the last 18 months officers at WECA, Bristol City Council, BANES, South Gloucestershire and North Somerset have been developing the new Local Cycling and Walking Infrastructure plan for the West of England sub-region. Bristol Cycling Campaign has been involved throughout the process and has had regular updates on the progress of the plan. It is expected to go out to public consultation in the coming months. We will make supporters of Bristol Cycling Campaign aware when this happens and encourage you to input into the consultation. Why it matters that Bristol…

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A Modest Proposal #8: Jamaica St cycleway

Every cyclist in Bristol will have their own strategy for coping with the James Barton roundabout, one of the worst in Bristol and the subject of our Modest Proposal #5: The Bear Pit / St James Barton Roundabout. Particularly as the Gloucester Road is one of the busiest cycling routes in the city, with its own  Modest Proposal #6; Eight to Eighty cycling on Gloucester Road. Most of us make use of Jamaica Street, but it can’t be called pleasant. It also boast some of the oldest and most idiosycratic ‘cycling facilities’ in Bristol. How about this ‘Modest Proposal’…

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Workshops on changes to the Railway Path – have your say!

Sustrans have funding to improve the Bristol end of the Railway Path between Trinity Road and Clay Bottom. The £1.2m project is being called the One Path: BS5 project and “aims to encourage positive behaviour and tackle issues such as conflict between path users”. It is funded by the Department for Transport and will be delivered by Sustrans in partnership with Bristol City Council. Hooray! But hold on there. There’s a line of thought that what’s needed are speed bumps, bollards, and chicanes. What do you think needs to be done? There are four events coming up to find out what the local community…

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What relevance does this weekend’s Marathon World Record attempt have for UK cycle infrastructure?

Tomorrow morning (12th October 2019) between 5am and 9am Eliud Kipchoge will attempt to break his marathon world record on a circuit in the famous Prater Park in Vienna. The course he will run is widely used in Vienna for recreation, particularly running races, but also as a main cycling throughfare. Its main attraction, is the tree lined straight “road” that cuts through the park, called the “Hauptalle” (shown from the air with Google Earth below). The 2.8 miles (4.5km) long Hauptalle is a truly unique stretch of tarmac, closed to motor traffic (except the odd Police car…

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Space for Cycling Update: April 2019

Silverthorne Lane and St Philips Marsh We have recently met developers and consultants about the Silverthorne Lane site and St Philip’s Marsh respectively, part of Temple Quarter. These are likely to be some of the largest re-development sites in Bristol in the coming years and are in close proximity to Temple Island and the University of Bristol Temple Meads site. There is an opportunity to build cycling in at the outset and we will be working to ensure that our voice is heard at an early stage in the process. A4018 Consultation The initial proposals put to consultation in…

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WECA Joint Local Transport Plan Consultation

So we know our new West of England Combined Authority (WECA), and our new metro Mayor, Conservative Tim Bowles, will soon be celebrating being two years old. What are they for? Well they currently have a Consultation on a plan for transport (called the JLTP) throughout the region up to 2036. Wow an opportunity to make our streets safe and healthy for people and kids. Reduce motor dependency, clean up air quality and create green space; well may be not. The author of the JLTP probably spent their childhood playing Grand Theft Auto in a dark place, not messing…

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Safe Cycling in NW Bristol ? Yes please

Want to cycle from Clifton to Henbury along a safe segregated cycle route? No we’re not joking; we don’t mean messy, sub standard national cycle route 4 but a new route along Westbury Rd, Falcondale Rd and Passage Rd, protected from motors. There is currently a consultation on new bus lanes on the A4018, which don’t seem popular locally. It’s not ambitious on cycling either; a new route on the Downs and, perhaps, traffic reduction in Westbury Village. Our meetings with Council Officers suggest, however, they’re seriously interested in a AAA (all ages and abilities) cycle route so may be…

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The results are in – Build it and they will come

Bristol Cycling Campaign has received data from Bristol City Council’s traffic counts on city centre roads where new segregated infrastructure has been built. We advocate protected, segregated cycle tracks as the best way to enable people of all ages and abilities to travel by bike and the results of the counts show it has been enormously successful so far. Baldwin Street The segregated cycle track on Baldwin Street in the Old City area of the city centre was built in two stages between 2015-2018 and the number of cycle movements increased from 893 (for a weekday…

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Update: City Centre Cycle Network

Bristol Cycling (BCyc) have recently been engaging with Bristol City Council (BCC) officers about the city centre cycle network. A lot has happened in the last few years so now is a good time for an update on some recent and upcoming schemes: The Prince Street cycle track has been fully open for a few months, is very well used and is functioning pretty well. BCyc raised a few queries about some elements of the design and we hope that action will be taken on these where possible as well as lessons learned for future schemes. Minor snags aside, overall…

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Bristol Transport Strategy Consultation – Our Response

Sharp eyed cycle campaign members will have noticed the new Bristol Transport Strategy (BTS), published at the end of September and out for consultation until 2 November 2018. The BTS is Bristol Council’s blueprint for defeating congestion, air pollution etc for the next 18 years; until 2036. If you were hoping for better cycling conditions than these people near the BRI, you may be waiting a while longer.

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